Home | About This Blog | About Me | Military | Spam | New Template | Comments | Quote

CLEVELAND SKYLINE

CLEVELAND SKYLINE
BORN HERE RAISED HERE AND MOST LIKELY WILL PASS AWAY AND BE BURIED HERE AS WELL.

San Francisco Skyline

San Francisco Skyline
This is a Tip of The Hat to Sandee, my Co-Author and blog wizard.

I've been in my own boat sitting out in this water looking at this view. Awesome!-Sandee.

MY HAMMERED DULCIMER

MY HAMMERED DULCIMER
There are various Hammered Dulcimer postings from YouTube of different tunes, and NO I AM NOT PLAYING ANY OF THESE TUNES.Maybe some day when I have the equipment to do so.I have included a link to my You Tube Channel.I invite you to go and watch any of my videos on the site also check out some of the different channels I subscribe to.

ABOUT THE HAMMERED DULCIMER

The hammered dulcimer is an ancient trapezoidal musical instrument played by striking the strings with wooden hammers.

Originating in the Middle East about 2000 years ago, English soldiers brought the instrument back to England after their failed attempt to conquer Persia during the Crusades about 1000 years ago. Dulcimers have many names in many lands: santur in the Middle East, yang q'in in China, hackbrett in Austria, zither in Germany, and cymbalom in Hungary. The name "dulcimer" is derived from Latin, meaning "sweet sound". Hammered dulcimers were popular in England during the reign of James I, when the Bible was translated into English as the King James Bible. The dulcimer was mentioned in the Book of Daniel 3:5 among other instruments "..the sound of the cornet, flute, harp, sackbut, psaltery, dulcimer, and all kinds of music..." The dulcimer was later mechanized to become what we now know as the harpsichord which later evolved in the piano.

THE BLOG ROLLS.

IN ORDER TO MAKE THIS PAGE LOAD EASIER I MOVED THE BLOG ROLLS TO A SEPARATE BLOG, THE BLOG ROLLS CAN BE FOUND HERE AT G.C.R.S. BLOGROLLS.

A good thought

A good thought

The Officer Down Memorial

The Officer Down Memorial
Click the Badge to go to the site.

THE SERENITY PRAYER

THE SERENITY PRAYER
God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change; courage to change the things I can; and wisdom to know the difference. Living one day at a time; enjoying one moment at a time; accepting hardships as the pathway to peace; taking, as He did, this sinful world as it is, not as I would have it; trusting that He will make all things right if I surrender to His Will; that I may be reasonably happy in this life and supremely happy with Him forever in the next. Amen. - Reinhold Niebuhr (1892-1971)

WHEN I'M HAVING A BAD DAY.

WHEN I'M HAVING A BAD DAY.
WHEN EVERYTHING IS JUST TOO MUCH, I WILL BE HIDING, PLAYING MY GAMES AND STAYING IN MY OWN LITTLE WORLD.

HEY MIKEY,THIS MEANS YOU!!

IF IT IS NOT BROKEN DO NOT TRY TO FIX IT MIKEY, YOU GOOF! - SIGNED ME

Mike - Take the word DELETE out of your vocabulary. Big hug... Sandee

NATIONAL SUICIDE PROVENTION LIFELINE

With Help Comes Hope

Veterans Hotline & Online Chat
Are you a veteran in emotional distress? Please call 1-800-273-TALK and press 1 to be routed to the Veterans Suicide Prevention Hotline.
OR Veterans chat live with a counselor.


Are you in crisis? Please call 1-800-273-TALK
Are you feeling desperate, alone or hopeless? Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), a free, 24-hour hotline available to anyone in suicidal crisis or emotional distress. Your call will be routed to the nearest crisis center to you.

I URGE ANYONE THAT NEEDS TO MAKE THIS CALL TO PLEASE DO SO.YOU ARE A PRECIOUS HUMAN BEING,YOU ARE SOMEONE'S LOVED ONE. GOD KNOWS WE ALL GO THROUGH A CRISIS AND NEED THE HELP.PLEASE CHOOSE LIFE!

I URGE ANYONE THAT NEEDS TO MAKE THIS CALL TO PLEASE DO SO.YOU ARE A PRECIOUS HUMAN BEING,YOU ARE SOMEONE'S LOVED ONE. GOD KNOWS WE ALL GO THROUGH A CRISIS AND NEED THE HELP. PLEASE CHOOSE LIFE.

THIS IS HERE TO REMIND ME AS WELL AS EVERYONE ELSE THAT LIFE IS IMPORTANT.

Blog Changes

Since I have decided to shut down Both Mike's Place and Loonytoon Central, Music Monday/Mondays Music Moves Me, Thursdays Tune, 5 On Friday, Feline Friday and the Google Doodles will now all be here.

I SEE YOU!!!

Sign by Danasoft - Get Your Sign

The Blogger's Prayer

Lord help me to learn to spell without spellcheck, manage to visit all that visit me, and post regularly - all in 5 minutes a day, so that I can clean house and take care of my family. Help me to not look at every occurrence in my life as a blog post, and to quit taking pictures of weird things to share as well. Please Lord, help me to stop talking about my blog friends as though they are next door neighbors or someone I have known all of my life. And help me dear Lord, to think of something witty and wise to post tomorrow.


IF YOU WANT TO SHARE ANY POSTINGS

ANYONE IS WELCOME TO TAKE THE STUFF POSTED HERE TO SHARE ON YOUR SITE. ALL I ASK IS A TIP OF THE HAT AND A LINK BACK. UNLESS I SAY HANDS OFF THIS POSTING!!!

Friday, April 16, 2010

A SAD POSTING

this posting is being brought to you via AIRMANMOM'S SITE.

Sad Numbers



AF suicide numbers near mid-1990s levels

Airmen are killing themselves at the highest rate in 15 years, and the brass is worried.

Eleven active-duty airmen had committed suicide through March 19, which projects to an annual rate of 13.7 suicides per 100,000 airmen. The numbers were already trending upward: The 2008 and 2009 rates were 12.4 and 12.5, after averaging fewer than 10 from 1998 through 2007. By comparison, the Army and Marine Corps had rates last year of 23 and 24. The Navy has not released its 2009 rate, but Air Force Times calculated it at 14.5 using data released by the service. The civilian suicide rate was 10.9 in 2006, the last year for which data are available.

Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz called attention to the rising rate in early March.

At a Senate hearing on the service’s proposed 2011 budget, Schwartz used a question from a lawmaker about the mental health challenges for unmanned aerial vehicle operators to bring up the service’s growing number of suicides.

Schwartz pointed out the importance of providing airmen with psychological support and having “commanders who care” about their airmen.

The Air Force has been a leader in suicide prevention for nearly 15 years. After watching its suicide rate peak at higher than 16 in the mid-1990s, the service established a prevention program focused on fostering a sense of community and identifying problems before airmen became suicidal. By the end of the decade, the suicide rate fell below 6.

Last year, the service decided to reassess its program. Today, the service is using a new interactive video to help airmen identify counterparts who are at risk, is tracking suicide data more closely and is urging everyone to be more open about their problems.

“If you have concerns about somebody, don’t ignore those,” said Lt. Col. Michael Kindt, a clinical psychologist. “Maybe they just didn’t get a good night’s sleep last night … or maybe it’s something that needs more engagement and more help.”

Enlisted male airmen are most likely to commit suicide. Men make up about 80 percent of the force and account for 95 percent of suicides; enlisted airmen are about 80 percent of the force and account for 90 percent of suicides, he said.

The career fields most at risk for suicide, according to Kindt:

— Security forces, because they have easy access to weapons.

— Intelligence officers, because they may be more hesitant to seek help because of security clearance concerns.

— Manned aircraft maintenance officers, for no readily apparent reason.

Psychologist David Rudd of the University of Utah, a nationally known suicide expert, attributes the Air Force’s relatively low rate — compared with the Army and Marine rates — to the service’s prevention program as well as its shorter deployments and more consistent operational tempo. Rudd, scientific director of the university’s National Center for Veterans Studies, has linked repeated exposure to combat with post-traumatic stress, depression and substance abuse — the top three causes of suicidal behavior.

In a speech at a suicide prevention conference, Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Adm. Mike Mullen voiced strong suspicion that deployments are to blame for high suicide rates.

“There does not appear to be any scientific correlation between the number of deployments and those who are at risk, but I’m just hard-pressed to believe that’s not the case,” Mullen said. “I know we are and hope to continue to look [at deployments] first to peel back the causes to get to the root of this.”

The Air Force, according to Kindt, isn’t ready to draw a direct connection between deployment and suicide. He acknowledged, however, that deployment creates conditions — strained personal relationships, for example — that “increase the overall stress on the force.”

Air Force leaders have discussed the service’s prevention program with their counterparts in the Army, Marine Corps and Navy, Kindt said, and other services now have training and courses similar to the Air Force’s.

The Army launched the Comprehensive Soldier Fitness program in October to emphasize mental well-being as much as physical well-being. The Marine Corps now requires all new corporals to take a suicide-prevention course so they can identify at-risk Marines early.

Rudd praised the Defense Department’s efforts at suicide prevention but cautioned new programs take time to be effective.

For Rudd, the best way to prevent suicides in the military is to ensure that service members are not afraid or embarrassed to ask for help, a cornerstone of the Air Force’s prevention program.

The Air Force’s efforts have made a difference, Kindt said, especially in war time.

“We encourage people to be good wingmen, to look after people in the same way you’d look after your brother or cousin or friend back home,” he said. “That has set us up well to minimize the impact of the ongoing war on our suicide rates.”


By Tom Spoth - Staff writer - Air Force Times
Posted : Saturday Apr 10, 2010 12:19:50 EDT
we need to keep these Airman in our prayers that they do not seek this solution to a emotional

10 comments:

Annesphamily said...

I am praying! My nephew who lives in Kentucky has a good friend who is retired Army, He is always telling him about the horrors of war those young people see and then can not cope with. My heart breaks. My mother use to say "Life is hard, pray harder." It is and I do!

The Creative Hare said...

I believe the risk of suicide is SEVERLY under estimated. When I served in the military there were three women in my platoon alone that were high risk and they said nothing in fear of being kicked out and ending up in their small towns with no where to go professionaly. I think our men and women need a LOT more places to turn to for talk therapy if for no other reason than to get off their chest what bothers them. They don't have be suicidal, just in need of an ear!

Thank you for posting this mike. Tammy

Mike Golch said...

Annesphamily,the stress of combat has always been there it has just been called different names since the Viet Nam war it has been called PTSD.Before that it was shellshocked.No matter what name is used the end result it the same on mentally wrecked person.

Mike Golch said...

The Creative Hare,I know exactly what you mean,I was susicidal and had seizures.I was too afraid to ask for help.I was afraid that I would be tossed out as well.

Jo said...

My prayers are going up Mike. Thank you for bringing this to our attention.

Whidbey Woman said...

Thank you for sharing this information with us. We need to remember those who are serving us and protecting us. They need our prayers not only while on duty, but in every day life.

Colleen said...

Thank you for this. I am praying.

Charlotte said...

This really is sad. Thank you for sharing this information. We need to constantly be in prayer for our military and for our country. Thank you for linking my blogs on your Faith Based blogs list.
Blessings,
Charlotte

Mike Golch said...

Jo,I thank AirmanMom who had this posted on her site,I am just passing this along.
Whidbey Woman,Colleen,and Charlotte,I try to highlight the need that is out there.

Syd said...

Thanks for sharing this. I had no idea and never really thought about it much.

Post a Comment

WELCOME TO GOLCH CENTRAL WHERE COMMENTS ARE WELCOME. THAT BEING SAID GO AHEAD AND MAKE MY DAY! GIVE ME A COMMENT, EVEN IF YOU LEAVE A NEGATIVE ONE. THE ONLY COMMENTS THAT WILL BE DELETED ARE SPAMMERS AND PERSONAL ATTACKS ON ME. I ANSWER YOUR COMMENTS, SO IF YOU WANT TO SEE WHAT I SAID COME BACK FOR A VISIT. Be kind and NO SPAM or personal attacks as those comments will never see the light of day on this blog! AS ALWAYS I'M GRATEFUL THAT YOU STOPPED BY.